Examples

Not sure how to work an overheard comment into a finished piece? Here are some examples of how other writers have previously written with their ears. Sometimes the overheard words are  just a starting point, and don’t appear at all in the finished piece. Other writers barely let the narrator intrude at all – we seem to hear only what they heard.

Added June 10th 2010:

Ian Duhig – Cage on the Armley Gaol Bus (poem)

Added June 7th 2010:

David Calcutt – In The Hairdressers (script)

Added June 3rd 2010:

Lorraine Mariner – Feathers (poem)

Alwyn Marriage – Overheard (poem)

Added late May 2010:

Jo Bell – Context (poem)

David Calcutt – The Last of England (script)

David Gaffney – Are Friends Electric? (Story)

Myra Schneider – I Have Never Milked a Camel (poem)

Derek Adams – One Sided Story (poem)

David Calcutt – In The Hairdressers


13 thoughts on “Examples

  1. I have a poem called ‘Waiting for the German Market” which was in my first collection, in which there are a couple of lines quoted verbatim from a woman I heard talking on her phone. She was actually, without knowing it, talking in iambics! I can send a copy of the poem.

  2. This is a fabulous idea and a great creativity-prodding exercise. I should admit I’ve often included snippets in stories which were just too delicious to be allowed to disappear:
    “She’s got a boyfriend at last.”
    “That’s good!”
    “Yes, but he’s short.”
    “Oh I am sorry.”
    And
    “What have you learned today?”
    “Not to pick up curling tongs by the hot end.”
    Good luck with this :)

  3. Pingback: Books » Archive » Listen up: writing project asks authors to eavesdrop and tell | Alison Flood

  4. Pingback: Listen up: writing project asks authors to eavesdrop and tell | Alison Flood | My Best Books

  5. Pingback: Listen Up | Travel Between The Pages

  6. It’s a really nice idea. I actually started to record and to listen to people on the bus just a few months ago as part of my final major project in college and now I’ve got a long book full of sketches and writing of people on the bus that I’m definitely going to use!

  7. Pingback: Literature » Listen up: writing project asks authors to eavesdrop and tell | Alison Flood

  8. Pingback: Bugged – Mission Loc@l -- San Francisco Mission District's News, Food, Art and Events

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s